About your Search

20130416
20130424
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
it was so hard to talk about. i've talked to doctors and law enforcement officials who have seen a lot of bad things in their day and they have a hard time talking about the carnage they saw yesterday. pamela, thank you very much. >> reporter: we're just getting word into cnn that president obama will make a statement 11:30 a.m. eastern time from the white house briefing room. not sure if it's an update on the investigation, if he has new news. but, again, that statement coming at 11:30 a.m. eastern time. we will of course bring it to you the second it happens. what happened in boston was terrifying for hundreds who were there at the scene when the bombs went off. it's terrifying to look at the video. cassidy brettler witnessed the terror firsthand. this is what she told cnn. >> i don't know. i mean, honestly, i got home last night about 11:00 and started to break down because i had been holding it in all day. i had been trying to remain composed. on social media and video just portray what was going on and tell my story. but by the time i was trying to fall asleep, it was hitting me,
law enforcement officials would be thinking at this time. >> well, i think the main goal right now is to get this other guy in custody before he hurts anybody else and try to close out the situation. he's a very, very dangerous person. i don't think anyone is safe in that area until he's apprehended. and it sounds to me like he doesn't want to be taken alive. so there could be another chutout before this whole thing is over. >> that's what you speculate because the other suspect had an ied strapped to his chest? >> absolutely. we don't know the whole background on these guys. we don't know what their motive was. we don't know exactly all the things. a lot of it is going to be -- we're going to determine that in the next several hours. but it doesn't sound like they want to be captured or he wants to be captured and go through the justice system. i think he's going to shoot it out within way or the other. >> let me ask you a quick question. can this be done by two individuals? meaning do you need more of a support system to get all of the materials that were clearly required to this
it into law. that undertaking and many others, john berry made a real difference of the more than 62,000 federal workers and everyone else who called my district home. just as we look to our federal workers to watch out for us, our federal workers look to john to watch out for them, to make sure they have a safe work environment, that their paychecks will arrive on time and the benefits they earn are the ones they receive. under president clinton, john served as deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary for law enforcement at the treasury department. overseeing the united states secret service and the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms. and he later moved to the interior department where he was assistant secretary for policy, management and budget, essentially the manager of the department of interior. before coming to the office of personnel management, john spent nearly a decade working on conservation as director of the fish and wildlife foundation, and then arguably the job he perhaps has enjoyed most, he became director of the national zoo. at the national z
is a brilliant law enforcement person but i always think the law enforcement person should be the head of the enforcement digs not a person at the top of the sec which sets a broader agenda which regulation is big thing that is unw problems she will face. let's hope she brings its up but i'm doubtful and this stuff will keep going on. lori: this happen so fast, in the blink of an eye and then recouped it. would this happen in the open outcry system? >> probably not they would say don't throw the baby out with the bath water. there is efficiencies when you hit a button to bypass a human being. i will tell you someone coming on here talking about jon corzine is not talking about jon corzine now which is little strange. melissa: that is the main story. you came here to talk about that. >> i'm just saying, specialists did prevent the wild volatility and that was a good thing. here is what we know about corzine if few minutes we have, i will throw this out there, he is not yet, he has been sued by louie freed, the bankruptcy trustee. i believe negligence was the word that freed threw around
things are temporary and they'll go away, we hope. >> my goal is i want to go back to law school and become a lawyer for bank of america. this is the most remarkable quarter where j.p. morgan beat them in credit card and pnc beats them in all lines, but in the end we got them here at the conference call because i just don't believe too could be that sluggish or that merrill could have such bad trading. there is a code here and i don't have it yet. i just don't believe that bank of america is this bad. i just don't think it's that much of an outlook. >> the stock is down, not a terrible move dunn. there was some litigation expense that perhaps was unexpected related to countrywide. the story in part has been let's release those litigation reserves that they've been building up, but not as much as had been hoped. that's still out there. >> you're taking a billion in costs and shouldn't you explore the earnings line? >> that's a lot of cost to take out, but you have to give credit, at least that they have been successful in doing what they said they would when it comes to costs. >>
by will you -- must include the contributions of the transgendered? by law. you will have to have pages on transgendered contributions. people who were crossed over sex, or dressed in the other sex. clothing. isn't that absurd? isn't that totalitarian? i thought the purpose of the textbook was to tell the truth, not make groups feel good. but as i point out in the book, leftism is overwhelmingly rooted in feelings. >> host: dennis prager is the author. "still the best hope" is the name of his recent best seller. louis from florida, you're on the air. you're talking with dennis prager. >> caller: i'd like to ask mr. prayinger and his ilk what he just said about truth, why should people believe the bible when that's the biggest novel ever written? who believes the earth is 5,000 years old? how can you follow a book that tells you the world is 5,000 years old and hisclass commentary about the christian schools and the seminary, how does he say something like that and he wants to be honest? i know this man is a right winger, and he wouldn't fifth credit to anybody, but my main question is,
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)